Car MOT Car MOT Paisley Autocare Our vehicle MOT’s are just £19.99 when booked online if you have any questions regarding an MOT then please get in touch prior to booking. What Do They Check in the MOT Test? The test is very comprehensive and will check multiple areas of your vehicle. Below is a basic list of all the things they are going to check during your MOT test: Emissions: One of the most well-known MOT checks is that of your exhaust system and emissions levels. If your exhaust has leaked at any point, it is likely to cause a test failure. If you enjoy car modding, you also had better make sure the original catalytic converter is still in place and still working. The emissions test particular looks for carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HC), oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate mass (PM). To meet “Euro 4” limits, the requirements are as follows: CO: 1000mg/km (petrol); 500mg/km (diesel) HC: 100mg/km (petrol); No single limit (diesel) NOx: 80mg/km (petrol); 300mg/km (diesel – combined with HC) PM: No limit (petrol); 25mg/km (diesel)  “Euro 5” limits came into effect from 2009 and are as follows: CO: 1000mg/km (petrol); 500mg/km (diesel) HC: 100mg/km (petrol); No single limit (diesel) NOx: 60mg/km (petrol); 230mg/km (diesel – combined with HC) PM: 5mg/km (petrol – direct injection only); 5mg/km (diesel) “Euro 6” limits came into effect from 2014 and are currently (as of January 2020) as follows: CO: 1000mg/km (petrol); 500mg/km (diesel) HC: 100mg/km (petrol); No single limit (diesel) NOx: 60mg/km (petrol); 170mg/km (diesel – combined with HC) PM: 4.5mg/km (petrol – direct injection only); 4.5mg/km (diesel) Brakes: Faulty brakes cause almost 10 percent of all MOT test failures. They check the condition of your pedals, as well as your warning lights and braking distance. Steering/Suspension: If your steering wheel feels loose or in otherwise bad condition, then you could fail the test. Qualified mechanics also check the shocks/struts and other related parts for wear and tear. Tyres Another 10 percent of tests are failed because of problems with the tyres. Tread depth is a common thing that goes wrong, not meeting the 1.6mm requirement. In addition, the test looks for defects like bulges and tears. Lamps and Reflectors: This is one of the biggest causes of failure, bringing about some 30 percent of MOT failures. The testers will check your headlights, indicators, fog lights, brake lights and rear lights, and not just that they light up. They also look at the position, general condition, colour, and whether they light up at a single press of the switch. Other Electrical Equipment Other electrically operated gear like the wiring, towbar socket for trailer lights, battery, horn and other similarly categorised equipment must be in good working order. Seat Belts If one or more of your seatbelts are the incorrect length or fail to connect properly with the clasp, then you’re certain to receive a failing grade. Other checks The test also ensures standards are being met on tings like corrosion on the key bodywork parts, proper registration plate spacing, font and visibility; a correct and visible Vehicle Identification Number (VIN), and that speedometer is accurate. One final thing is driver visibility from the cockpit. This last one can be impacted by insecure mirrors, faulty wipers or anything that would otherwise impact your field of vision while out driving.   Check Your Vehicle’s Status   If you’re not sure whether or not your vehicle is due for its next MOT, you can go to the gov.uk website (https://www.gov.uk/check-mot-status) and enter the registration to see your current MOT status. If you had an MOT within the last 12 months, but are not certain when to get the next one, we recommend going about a week before the date of your previous test. This will allow you to drive away should there be Major faults that need attending to, but not Dangerous faults, because your current MOT is still valid. Keep on top of your MOT information and stay on the right side of the law. It’s not just about your own safety, but that of other road users.
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Our vehicle MOT’s are just £19.99 when booked online if you have any questions regarding an MOT then please get in touch prior to booking.

What Do They Check in the MOT Test?

car mot check

The test is very comprehensive and will check multiple areas of your vehicle. Below is a basic list of all the things they are going to check during your MOT test:

Emissions:

mot emission

One of the most well-known MOT checks is that of your exhaust system and emissions levels. If your exhaust has leaked at any point, it is likely to cause a test failure. If you enjoy car modding, you also had better make sure the original catalytic converter is still in place and still working.

The emissions test particular looks for carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HC), oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate mass (PM). To meet “Euro 4” limits, the requirements are as follows:

  • CO: 1000mg/km (petrol); 500mg/km (diesel)
  • HC: 100mg/km (petrol); No single limit (diesel)
  • NOx: 80mg/km (petrol); 300mg/km (diesel – combined with HC)
  • PM: No limit (petrol); 25mg/km (diesel)

 “Euro 5” limits came into effect from 2009 and are as follows:

  • CO: 1000mg/km (petrol); 500mg/km (diesel)
  • HC: 100mg/km (petrol); No single limit (diesel)
  • NOx: 60mg/km (petrol); 230mg/km (diesel – combined with HC)
  • PM: 5mg/km (petrol – direct injection only); 5mg/km (diesel)

“Euro 6” limits came into effect from 2014 and are currently (as of January 2020) as follows:

  • CO: 1000mg/km (petrol); 500mg/km (diesel)
  • HC: 100mg/km (petrol); No single limit (diesel)
  • NOx: 60mg/km (petrol); 170mg/km (diesel – combined with HC)
  • PM: 4.5mg/km (petrol – direct injection only); 4.5mg/km (diesel)

Brakes:

mot brake check

Faulty brakes cause almost 10 percent of all MOT test failures. They check the condition of your pedals, as well as your warning lights and braking distance.

Steering/Suspension:

mot steering check

If your steering wheel feels loose or in otherwise bad condition, then you could fail the test. Qualified mechanics also check the shocks/struts and other related parts for wear and tear.

Tyres

mot tyre check

Another 10 percent of tests are failed because of problems with the tyres. Tread depth is a common thing that goes wrong, not meeting the 1.6mm requirement. In addition, the test looks for defects like bulges and tears.

Lamps and Reflectors:

mot lamps

This is one of the biggest causes of failure, bringing about some 30 percent of MOT failures. The testers will check your headlights, indicators, fog lights, brake lights and rear lights, and not just that they light up. They also look at the position, general condition, colour, and whether they light up at a single press of the switch.

Other Electrical Equipment

Other electrically operated gear like the wiring, towbar socket for trailer lights, battery, horn and other similarly categorised equipment must be in good working order.

Seat Belts

seatbelt check

If one or more of your seatbelts are the incorrect length or fail to connect properly with the clasp, then you’re certain to receive a failing grade.

Other checks

The test also ensures standards are being met on tings like corrosion on the key bodywork parts, proper registration plate spacing, font and visibility; a correct and visible Vehicle Identification Number (VIN), and that speedometer is accurate. One final thing is driver visibility from the cockpit. This last one can be impacted by insecure mirrors, faulty wipers or anything that would otherwise impact your field of vision while out driving.

 

Check Your Vehicle’s Status

 

If you’re not sure whether or not your vehicle is due for its next MOT, you can go to the gov.uk website (https://www.gov.uk/check-mot-status) and enter the registration to see your current MOT status. If you had an MOT within the last 12 months, but are not certain when to get the next one, we recommend going about a week before the date of your previous test. This will allow you to drive away should there be Major faults that need attending to, but not Dangerous faults, because your current MOT is still valid.

Keep on top of your MOT information and stay on the right side of the law. It’s not just about your own safety, but that of other road users.

Our vehicle MOT’s are just £19.99 when booked online if you have any questions regarding an MOT then please get in touch prior to booking.

What Do They Check in the MOT Test?

car mot check

The test is very comprehensive and will check multiple areas of your vehicle. Below is a basic list of all the things they are going to check during your MOT test:

Emissions:

mot emission

One of the most well-known MOT checks is that of your exhaust system and emissions levels. If your exhaust has leaked at any point, it is likely to cause a test failure. If you enjoy car modding, you also had better make sure the original catalytic converter is still in place and still working.

The emissions test particular looks for carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HC), oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate mass (PM). To meet “Euro 4” limits, the requirements are as follows:

  • CO: 1000mg/km (petrol); 500mg/km (diesel)
  • HC: 100mg/km (petrol); No single limit (diesel)
  • NOx: 80mg/km (petrol); 300mg/km (diesel – combined with HC)
  • PM: No limit (petrol); 25mg/km (diesel)

 “Euro 5” limits came into effect from 2009 and are as follows:

  • CO: 1000mg/km (petrol); 500mg/km (diesel)
  • HC: 100mg/km (petrol); No single limit (diesel)
  • NOx: 60mg/km (petrol); 230mg/km (diesel – combined with HC)
  • PM: 5mg/km (petrol – direct injection only); 5mg/km (diesel)

“Euro 6” limits came into effect from 2014 and are currently (as of January 2020) as follows:

  • CO: 1000mg/km (petrol); 500mg/km (diesel)
  • HC: 100mg/km (petrol); No single limit (diesel)
  • NOx: 60mg/km (petrol); 170mg/km (diesel – combined with HC)
  • PM: 4.5mg/km (petrol – direct injection only); 4.5mg/km (diesel)

Brakes:

mot brake check

Faulty brakes cause almost 10 percent of all MOT test failures. They check the condition of your pedals, as well as your warning lights and braking distance.

Steering/Suspension:

mot steering check

If your steering wheel feels loose or in otherwise bad condition, then you could fail the test. Qualified mechanics also check the shocks/struts and other related parts for wear and tear.

Tyres

mot tyre check

Another 10 percent of tests are failed because of problems with the tyres. Tread depth is a common thing that goes wrong, not meeting the 1.6mm requirement. In addition, the test looks for defects like bulges and tears.

Lamps and Reflectors:

mot lamps

This is one of the biggest causes of failure, bringing about some 30 percent of MOT failures. The testers will check your headlights, indicators, fog lights, brake lights and rear lights, and not just that they light up. They also look at the position, general condition, colour, and whether they light up at a single press of the switch.

Other Electrical Equipment

Other electrically operated gear like the wiring, towbar socket for trailer lights, battery, horn and other similarly categorised equipment must be in good working order.

Seat Belts

seatbelt check

If one or more of your seatbelts are the incorrect length or fail to connect properly with the clasp, then you’re certain to receive a failing grade.

Other checks

The test also ensures standards are being met on tings like corrosion on the key bodywork parts, proper registration plate spacing, font and visibility; a correct and visible Vehicle Identification Number (VIN), and that speedometer is accurate. One final thing is driver visibility from the cockpit. This last one can be impacted by insecure mirrors, faulty wipers or anything that would otherwise impact your field of vision while out driving.

 

Check Your Vehicle’s Status

 

If you’re not sure whether or not your vehicle is due for its next MOT, you can go to the gov.uk website (https://www.gov.uk/check-mot-status) and enter the registration to see your current MOT status. If you had an MOT within the last 12 months, but are not certain when to get the next one, we recommend going about a week before the date of your previous test. This will allow you to drive away should there be Major faults that need attending to, but not Dangerous faults, because your current MOT is still valid.

Keep on top of your MOT information and stay on the right side of the law. It’s not just about your own safety, but that of other road users.

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